Symbolism in jane eyre

Martin points out, The setting of the story is carefully divided into five distinct locales, each of which has its particular significance in Jane's history and each of which is like an act in a five-act drama. Her early childhood is spent in Gateshead Hallthe home of the Reeds; from there she goes to Lowoodwhere she comes under the influence of Mr. Brocklehurst, Miss Temple, and Helen Burns; as governess to Adele at Thornfield she falls in love with Rochester; after the discovery of the existence of Bertha, Jane runs away and is taken into Moor Housethe home of her cousins, the Rivers family; in the conclusion of the book she and Rochester are united at his crumbling hunting-lodge, Ferndean Manor.

Symbolism in jane eyre

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On a number of instances in the first three chapters, Jane mentions that "the room was chill," and "I sat wrapped before the hearth. Then, in Chapter 4, Jane likens her mind to "a ridge of lighted heath, alive, glancing, devouring. In Jane Eyre fire and ice are key symbols. Fire is a symbol of Jane's passionate, fiercely independent nature, while ice is symbolic of the forces against her such as Brocklehurst and the horrible Lowood School where the freezing temperatures chill the girls who are ill-dressed for them.

Each morning the frozen pitchers of water "greet" them. After her wedding to Mr. Rochester is interrupted by the objections of Briggs, a solicitor of Richard Mason, Rochester's brother-in-law, Jane describes her mental state in Chapter A Christmas frost had whirled over June; ice glazed the ripe apples, Symbolism in jane eyre crushed the blowing roses; on hafield and cornfield lay a frozen shroud: My hopes were all dead I looked at my love Before she leaves Rochester, Jane decides she "must be ice and rock to him.

John proposes to Jane, she concludes that if she marries him she would be Always restrained and always checked--forced to keep the fire of my nature continually low, to compel it turn burn inwardly and never utter a cry Fire also symbolizes cleansing.

After the fire that leaves Mr. Rochester a widower but blind, his soul has been purged of its corruption as some critics perceive Bertha as symbolic of what Jane's surrender to Rochester earlier could have brought about.

A humbled, but better man it is that Jane can finally marry after the fire destroys the mansion and Bertha.

Also, she recalls this room on the night she decides to leave Mr. Rochester after their marriage is foiled. Here again red can represent fire, for only after the fire at Thornfield does she rid herself of the haunting memory of the red room.

The day after Mr. This splintered tree is symbolic of the split between Jane and Rochester, and it also symbolizes Mr. Rochester himself after the fire as he tells Jane he has no right to ask her to live with him since he is but a broken man.

Others see Bertha as representative of the Victorian woman, who is trapped in her role as homemaker and mother. Her insanity serves as a warning to Jane to maintain her independence.

For, when Thornfield comes to represent a state of servitude, Bertha burns it to the ground. Since Jane often describes her nature as "fiery," and "a ridge of lighted heath," Bertha is the manifestation, contend critics, of Jane's inner self.Orphaned at an early age, Jane Eyre, leads a lonely life until she finds a position as a governess at Thornfield Hall.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. Home / Literature / Jane Eyre / Analysis / Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory / The Red Room ; Symbolism, Imagery, Jane isn't just getting reborn (which is what usually happens, symbolically, when someone is forced into an enclosed space in literature). Related Material. Charlotte Brontë and Wesleyan Methodism; Religious Characters in the novel. Religious Belief in Jane Eyre; Questioning Evangelical Religion in Brontë and Dickens. Jean Rhys and Charlotte Bronte The use of symbolism in the presentation of characters and plots in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea by Jenia Geraghty.

There she meets the mysterious Mr. Rochester and sees a . The Jane Eyre quotes below all refer to the symbol of Eyes. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one.

From the SparkNotes Blog

There are multiple Symbols and motifs that are found in Jane Eyre. Some examples of some motifs include ice, fire, food, etc.

Some examples of symbols would include Bertha Mason, the splintered chestnut tree, and the Red-room. Fire is the most prominent motif throughout the book, and it represents Jane's passion and spirit, her oppression and . A summary of Themes in Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre.

Symbolism in jane eyre

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Jane Eyre and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. Home / Literature / Jane Eyre / Analysis / Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory / The Red Room ; Symbolism, Imagery, Jane isn't just getting reborn (which is what usually happens, symbolically, when someone is forced into an enclosed space in literature). 'Jane Eyre' is a literary masterwork in which an array of symbols is used to create an unforgettable Gothic feel.

Symbolism in Jane Eyre What if you knew the person you planned to marry was.

Jane Eyre's Religious Themes and Contexts